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Civil disobedience is more than just a “conscientious, nonviolent act”

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The moral justification of civil disobedience is especially important when the laws violated are those of a legitimate state.

Many political and legal theorists believe that no modern state has a general, morally justifiable claim to its subjects’ obedience.

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Civil disobedience to law may be morally salient even for those who live in an illegitimate state.

Civil disobedience is both a political tactic and the foundation of social change movements.

Participants in civil disobedience refuse to obey a law in order to highlight an issue they believe is unjust.

An environmentalist blocking a logging road is an example of civil disobedience.

Civil disobedience is both a political tactic and the foundation of social change movements.

It is a nonviolent action taken by an individual who, for moral or philosophical reasons, refuses to obey a law.

Campaigns of civil disobedience frequently have a religious, spiritual, or philosophical basis. Civil disobedience is the moral disobedience of a law, usually nonviolently and publicly.

Accepting the penalty allows protesters to show their support for legal processes. This is far more restrained than the ideas of one of its most famous proponents, Henry David Thoreau.